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Traditional Jewellery Guide for the Rajasthani Bride

Regal and bold, a Rajasthani bride’s jewellery is a fusion of traditional Rajput splendor & Mughal elegance.

Replete with heritage and stunning architecture, Rajasthani culture is synonymous with royalty. Its legacy is reflected in the state’s jewellery, and a Rajasthani bride’s bling trousseau is as unique as it gets. From Rajput to Mughal influences, every item is a distinctive one featuring beautiful aspects of Kundan, meenakari, and polki work, alongside gorgeous handcrafted pieces with diamonds and gems.

Kundan Butti:
A variation of the ever-popular ‘jhumka,’ (traditional dangling earrings), the ‘Kundan buttis,’ as the name suggests, are earrings studded with Kundan, an uncut gemstone style that is most popular in the state of Rajasthan.

Kundan Butti
Kundan Butti

Photo Courtesy: Manubhai Jewellers (left); Rolling Canvas Presentations (right)

Aad:
A choker necklace that boasts of a gem-studded broad rectangular locket and a beaded necklace, the ‘aad’ is unique to Rajasthani culture, and has recently captured the imagination of contemporary brides from different cultures.

Aad
Aad

Photo Courtesy: Jagdish Jewellers (left); Navrathan Jewellers (right)

Choora:
Made out of lac, these bridal red bangles are worn by brides across India, and are usually paired with other bangles and bracelets studded with diamonds and precious stones.

Choora
Choora

Photo Courtesy: Deep Joshi Gallery (left); Rangbari Cinema (right)

Timaniya:
Another choker necklace to grace the Rajasthani bride’s jewellery box, the ‘timaniya’ is a dainty creation and features uncut diamonds.

TimaniyaPhoto Courtesy: Shutterdown

Borla:
Completely unique to the Rajasthani bride, the ‘borla’ is a ‘maang tikka’ (forehead ornament) with a bell-shaped locket instead of the usual flat one.

Borla
Borla

Photos Courtesy: Shades Photography (left); Tumtum official (right)

Mathapatti:
A luxurious hair accessory crafted out of multiple borlas, the ‘mathapatti’ sits snugly on the bride’s crown bordering the hairline.

MathapattiPhoto Courtesy: Infinite Memories

Sheeshpatti:
Similar to the ‘mathapatti,’ the ‘sheeshpatti’ is worn further down the head like a headband and is usually crafted out of gold or silver.

Sheeshpatti
Sheeshpatti

Photos Courtesy: Jag Photo Studios (left); The Wedding Crasher (right)

Nath:
A statement nose ring that is usually adorned with floral motifs, kundan or pearl drops, the nathani is favored by several brides across the Indian subcontinent, including Rajasthani brides.

Nath
Nath

Photos Courtesy: Jasmine Beauty Care (left); Alif Studio Cineweddings (right)

Bajubandh:
A popular accessory amongst brides all over India, the Rajasthani armlet typically features intricate meenakari work and is studded with precious stones.

Bajubandh
Bajubandh

Photos Courtesy: Beendani (Left); Stories by Joseph Radhik (right)

Tagdi:
Also known as the ‘kamarbandh’ (waist cincher), the ‘tagdi’ is a heavy waist chain adorned with kundan or polki work, and is worn to accentuate the waist.

Tagdi
Tagdi

Photos Courtesy: Prerto (left); Sukkhi (right)

Hasli:
Worn by brides as well as other women during festive occasions, the hasli is a small yet thick gold necklace that sports intricate patterns and rests at the base of the neck.

Hasli
Hasli

Photos Courtesy: Tanishq (left); Sunita Shekhawat Jaipur (right)

Raani Haar:
A waist-long necklace and probably one of the most ornate necklaces that a bride had to wear, the ‘raani haar’ is a heavy necklace and a must-have for a Rajput bride.

Raani Haar
Raani Haar

Photos Courtesy: Shades Photography (left); Jag Photo Studios (right)

Bangadi:
A pair of heavy gold bangles that adorn the bride’s wrists, the bangadi is usually a treasured heirloom that boasts of intricate patterns.

Bangadi
Bangadi

Photo Courtesy: Ahilya Jewels (left); Avantika Meattle (right)

Gokharu:
Accompanying the heavy bangles, the ‘gokharu’ is a heavier bangle that is much wider than the bangadi and is crafted out of gold.

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Gokharu

Photo Courtesy: Shrihari Diagems by Anirudh (left); Anita Dongre (right)

Gajara:
A pearl studded bangle that resembles jasmine flowers that are commonly worn in the hair, the ‘gajara’ bangle, as the name suggests, is white in color due to the pearls attached to its surface and is formed like a ‘gokharu.’

Gajara
Gajara

Photos Courtesy: Tanishq (left); Sephi Bergerson (right)

Pacheli:
A mix of the ‘gokharu’ and the ‘bangadi,’ this heavy bracelet style bangle boasts of colorful enamel or gemstones on its surface and is closed with a clasp.

Pacheli
Pacheli

Photos Courtesy: Sunita Shekhawat Jaipur (left); Rupalisheen (right)

Haath Phool:
An accessory that is popular among brides all over India, the Rajasthani ‘hath phool’ is a wristlet with rings that slip onto the fingers and features a distinctly Mughal design.

Haath Phool
Haath Phool

Photos Courtesy: Pinimg (left); Morviimages (right)

Bichiya:
A pair of silver toe rings that are studded with colorful gems, the bichiya is worn by the bride on both her middle toes and signifies her married status.

Bichiya
Bichiya

Photos Courtesy: Khoobsurati (left)

Payal:
Crafted out of silver, the Rajasthani bride’s anklets are generally hidden under her heavy skirt, but tinkle with every step she takes.

Payal
Payal

Photos Courtesy: Mortantra (left); Emoce Weddings (right)

Here’s a list of stores where you can find Rajasthani jewelry to suit your tastes:

Rambhajos
Sunita Shekhawat
BG Jewellers
Mortantra Jewellery
Amrapali Jewellers
Jaipur Jewels
Shree Jee Jewellers
Motisons Jewellers
Kalajee Jewellers
Surana Jewellery

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